About Vietnam

The northern part of Vietnam was part of Imperial China for over a millennium, from 111 BC to AD 939. An independent Vietnamese state was formed in 939, following a Vietnamese victory in the Battle of Bạch Đằng River. Successive Vietnamese imperial dynasties flourished as the nation expanded geographically and politically into Southeast Asia, until the Indochina Peninsula was colonized by the French in the mid-19th century. Following a Japanese occupation in the 1940s, the Vietnamese fought French rule in the First Indochina War, eventually expelling the French in 1954. Thereafter, Vietnam was divided politically into two rival states, North Vietnam (officially the Democratic Republic of Vietnam), and South Vietnam (officially the Republic of Vietnam). Conflict between the two sides intensified in what is known as the Vietnam War, with heavy intervention by the United States on the side of South Vietnam from 1965 to 1973. The war ended with a North Vietnamese victory in 1975

Capital Hanoi
Largest city Ho Chi Minh City
Official language and national language Vietnamese
Area 332,698 km2 (128,455 sq mi) (65th)
Total Water (%) 6.4
Population 92,700,000
Currency đồng (₫) (VND)
Time zone (UTC+7)

Best Time to visit

The most popular time to visit Vietnam is during the spring season, February through to April, and autumn season, August through to October. This is when you’ll find the weather to be gorgeous and warm, without being too hot or too cool. You’ll also find there’s less rain at these times of the year. If you’re planning on visiting destinations in the north of Vietnam, like Sapa and Hanoi look to visit from October through to December. If you’re planning on visiting destinations along the coastline, like Hue and Nha Trang, look to visit from January to July. For destinations in the south of Vietnam, like Ho Chi Minh, November through to February are your best bet.

Visa

Below is the link for applying Vietnam Visa.
https://www.xuatnhapcanh.gov.vn/

Currency

The Vietnamese dong (VND), Vietnam’s official currency, comes in polymerized notes with multiple zeroes: VND 10,000 is the smallest bill you'll find on the street these days (coins of as low as VND 200 have long been phased out), with the upper limit hit by the VND 500,000 bill.

Voltage

For Vietnam there are three associated plug types, types A, C and F. Plug type A is the plug which has two flat parallel pins, plug type C is the plug with two round pins and plug type F has two round pins with two earth clips on the side. Vietnam operates on a 220V supply voltage and 50Hz.

Demographics

As of 2014, the population of Vietnam as standing at approximately 90.7 million people. The population had grown significantly from the 1979 census, which showed the total population of reunified Vietnam to be 52.7 million. In 2012, the country's population was estimated at approximately 90.3 million.[5] Currently, the total fertility rate of Vietnam is 1.8 (births per woman), which is largely due to the government's family planning policy, the two-child policy.

Largest cities or towns

1. Hồ Chí Minh City 2. Hà Nội
3. Hải Phòng 4. Cần Thơ
5. Biên Hòa 6. Đà Nẵng
7. Nha Trang 8. Buôn Ma Thuột
9. Huế 10. Vinh

Languages

The official national language of Vietnam is Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt), a tonal Mon–Khmer language which is spoken by the majority of the population. In its early history, Vietnamese writing used Chinese characters. Vietnam's minority groups speak a variety of languages, including Tày, Mường, Cham, Khmer, Chinese, Nùng, and H'Mông. The Montagnard peoples of the Central Highlands also speak a number of distinct languages.[128] A number of sign languages have developed in the cities. The French language, a legacy of colonial rule, is spoken by many educated Vietnamese as a second language, especially among the older generation and those educated in the former South Vietnam, where it was a principal language in administration, education and commerce; Vietnam remains a full member of the Francophonie, and education has revived some interest in the language

Religion

73.2% Folk or Irreligious
12.2% Buddhism
8.3% Christianity
4.8% Caodaism
1.4% Hoahaoism
0.1% Other religions[2]

Culture

Vietnam's culture has developed over the centuries from indigenous ancient Đông Sơn culture with wet rice agriculture as its economic base. Some elements of the national culture have Chinese origins, drawing on elements of Confucianism and Taoism in its traditional political system and philosophy. Vietnamese society is structured around làng (ancestral villages); all Vietnamese mark a common ancestral anniversary on the tenth day of the third lunar month. The influences of immigrant peoples – such as the Cantonese, Hakka, Hokkien and Hainan cultures – can also be seen, while the national religion of Buddhism is strongly entwined with popular culture. The traditional focuses of Vietnamese culture are humanity (nhân nghĩa) and harmony (hòa); family and community values are highly regarded. Vietnam reveres a number of key cultural symbols, such as the Vietnamese dragon, which is derived from crocodile and snake imagery; Vietnam's National Father, Lạc Long Quân, is depicted as a holy dragon. The lạc – a holy bird representing Vietnam's National Mother, Âu Cơ – is another prominent symbol, while turtle and horse images are also revered.

Festivals

Vietnam has a plethora of festivals based on the lunar calendar, the most important being the Tết New Year celebration. Traditional Vietnamese weddings remain widely popular, and are often celebrated by expatriate Vietnamese in Western countries.





Climate

Because of differences in latitude and the marked variety in topographical relief, the climate tends to vary considerably from place to place. During the winter or dry season, extending roughly from November to April, the monsoon winds usually blow from the northeast along the Chinese coast and across the Gulf of Tonkin, picking up considerable moisture. Consequently, the winter season in most parts of the country is dry only by comparison with the rainy or summer season. The average annual temperature is generally higher in the plains than in the mountains, and higher in the south than in the north. Temperatures vary less in the southern plains around Ho Chi Minh City and the Mekong Delta, ranging between 21 and 28 °C (69.8 and 82.4 °F) over the course of the year. Seasonal variations in the mountains and plateaus and in the north are much more dramatic, with temperatures varying from 5 °C (41.0 °F) in December and January to 37 °C (98.6 °F) in July and August.

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